Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles

J. Frank Best, Certified Public Accountant
Admitted to Practice before the
United States Tax Court

Practice Areas & Locations

TAX LITIGATION
TAX AUDITS
APPEALS & HEARINGS
COLLECTION
PENALTY ABATEMENT
NON-FILERS & DELINQUENT
CIVIL FRAUD
CRIMINAL FRAUD – KOVEL
IRS ABUSE OF DISCRETION
DIVORCE AND IRS

RALEIGH, NC
WILMINGTON, NC
NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC
MYRTLE BEACH, SC

IRS controversies are truly complicated. There is no magic to a resolution. Experience and qualifications dictate. Many advertisements and promises are intentionally false and misleading. By all means, avoid meeting with and having telephone contact with marketing/salespersons that will not be representing you. These people are highly trained to take your money. Choosing a local representative just makes good business sense.

Telephone: 800.230.7090 | Email: bestcpa@bestirscpa.com
Copyright © 2018, J.Frank Best, Certified Public Accountant

Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles

J. Frank Best a Tax Controversy CPA with locations in Raleigh & Wilmington, NC  and North Myrtle Beach & Myrtle Beach, SC is rated in the Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles/Linkedin and as a United States Tax Court Litigator licensed in all States works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.

PRACTICE AREAS-ALL STATES

TAX LITIGATION
AUDITS
APPEALS & HEARINGS
COLLECTION
NON-FILERS AND DELINQUENT
CIVIL FRAUD
CRIMINAL FRAUD-KOVEL

800.230.7090
email: bestcpa@bestirscpa.com
web: bestirscpa.com

LICENSED CPA: NC (14839) & SC (2505)
U.S. TAX COURT LITIGATOR: ALL STATES (BJ2034)
PRACTICE BEFORE THE IRS: ALL STATES

U.S.TAX COURT LITIGATOR

J. Frank Best a U.S. Tax Court Litigator with locations in North Myrtle Beach & Myrtle Beach, SC and Wilmington & Raleigh, NC and licensed in all States is rated in the Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles/Linkedin and as a U.S.Tax Court Litigator works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.

Telephone 800.230.7090   Email: bestcpa@bestirscpa.com  Web: bestirscpa.com

Tax Controversy CPA

J. Frank Best a Tax Controversy CPA with locations in North Myrtle Beach & Myrtle Beach, SC and Wilmington & Raleigh, NC is rated in the Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles/Linkedin and as a United States Tax Court Litigator licensed in all States works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.

Telephone 800.230.7090   Email: bestcpa@bestirscpa.com  Web: bestirscpa.com

North Myrtle Beach, SC Tax Controversy CPA

J. Frank Best a North Myrtle Beach, SC Tax Controversy CPA  with locations in North Myrtle Beach & Myrtle Beach, SC and Wilmington & Raleigh, NC is rated in the Top 5 Tax Controversy CPA Profiles/Linkedin and as a United States Tax Court Litigator licensed in all States works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.

Telephone 800.230.7090   Email: bestcpa@bestirscpa.com  Web: bestirscpa.com

No Tax Court Jurisdiction Over Employment Tax Liability

A recent Tax Court decision was reported dealing with Tax Court Jurisdiction. J. Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U. S. Tax Court Litigator with locations in Raleigh and Wilmington, NC  & North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach, SC works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for clients

No jurisdiction was determined by the Eighth Circuit and the Eight Circuit affirmed the dismissal of an S corporation’s Tax Court petition challenging an IRS determination that the compensation paid to the sole owner and officer of the S corporation was unreasonable. The Eighth Circuit found that there was no actual controversy under Code Sec. 7436 as to the determination of the S corporation shareholder’s employment status for Federal Insurance Contribution Act (FICA) tax purposes and thus Code Sec. 7436 did not come into play. Azarian v. Comm’r, 2018 PTC 229 (8th Cir. 2018).

Under Code Sec. 7436(a)(1), the Tax Court has jurisdiction over a petition if there is an actual controversy involving a determination that an individual performing services is an employee for FICA tax purposes. Thus, the issue was whether there was an actual controversy involving a determination that Azarian was an employee for FICA tax purposes.

The Eighth Circuit affirmed the Tax Court’s dismissal for lack of jurisdiction. The Eighth Circuit found that even if there was an actual controversy, it did not involve a determination that Azarian was an employee for FICA tax purposes as required under Code Sec. 7436(a)(1). The court determined that by reporting wages to Azarian each year, the S corporation claimed Azarian was an employee, so the IRS did not make a determination on that issue. Instead, the IRS relied on the S corporation’s classification.

Improvements to Rental Home/Contact Best Tax Controversy CPA/U.S. Tax Court Litigator

A recent Tax Court decision was reported dealing with Improvement to Rental Home.   J. Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U. S. Tax Court Litigator with locations in Raleigh and Wilmington, NC  & North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach, SC works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for clients

Couple Can’t Deduct Cost of Improvements to Home Allegedly Rented to Relatives: In Perry v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018-90, the Tax Court held that a couple did not establish that they rented their second home to relatives and that, even if the court were to find that the couple did in fact rent the house to their relatives, the couple failed to carry their burden of establishing improvements to rental that they rented such home at fair rental value. Thus, the court denied the couple’s deduction for improvements made to that home.

Restitution Payment- J. Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U.S. Tax Court Litigator

Restitution Payments

A recent Tax Court decision was reported dealing with Restitution Payments as Part of a Criminal Sentence.  J.  Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U. S. Tax Court Litigator in Raleigh and Wilmington, NC  & North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach, SC works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.

The Tax Court held that a taxpayer was not entitled to a miscellaneous itemized deduction for a $400,000 restitution payment made in 2014. The court concluded that (1) the taxpayer did not show that the restitution payment promoted or protected his trade or business of being an employee; (2) the taxpayer did not present any evidence that the primary purpose or motive for the payment was other than that he was required to make the payment as part of a criminal sentence; and (3) the taxpayer did not enter into the restitution transaction with the intention of making a profit. Washburn v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018-110.

Conclusion

The Tax Court held that Washburn could not deduct the restitution payments as a miscellaneous itemized deduction in 2014. The court began by noting that the restitution payments would be deductible as a miscellaneous itemized deduction if they constituted expenses attributable to the performance of services as an employee under Code Sec. 162(a), losses related to the performance of services as an employee under Code Sec. 165(c)(1), or losses incurred in a transaction entered into for profit under Code Sec. 165(c)(2).

Innocent Spouse Relief/J. Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U. S. Tax Court Litigator

A recent Tax Court decision was reported dealing with Innocent Spouse Relief.  J.  Frank Best, Tax Controversy CPA/U. S. Tax Court Litigator in Raleigh and Wilmington, NC  & North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach, SC works to stay current on all IRS decisions concerning tax litigation to ensure we are fully informed and prepared for our clients.  

No Innocent Spouse Relief for Widow Who Failed to Report Insurance Proceeds on Form 8857

The Tax Court held that a widow was not entitled to innocent spouse relief from tax liabilities that arose over several years in which she and her husband filed joint returns but did not pay taxes owed. The court cited the fact that, after her husband’s death, the widow invested the proceeds of life insurance policies purchased by her husband without her knowledge in several savings accounts opened in her parents’ names and did not report the proceeds to the IRS when she requested relief. Hale v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018-93.

Analysis

Spouses filing joint tax returns are generally jointly and severally liable for any taxes owed. However, Code Sec. 6015(f) allows a spouse to be relived from liability if it would be inequitable to hold the spouse liable.

Rev. Proc. 2013-34 lists seven factors to consider if certain threshold conditions do not apply. The factors are: (1) whether the couple is still married, (2) whether economic hardship would arise if relief is not granted, (3) whether the requesting spouse had reason to know that the taxes would not be paid, (4) whether either spouse had a legal obligation to pay the taxes, (5) whether the requesting spouse significantly benefitted from the unpaid taxes, (6) whether the requesting spouse made a good faith effort to comply with the income tax laws in subsequent years, and (7) whether the requesting spouse was in poor health at the time the returns were filed.

The Tax Court held that it would not be inequitable to deny relief to Mrs. Hale. The court explained that a simple toting up of the seven factors would support granting relief, because Mrs. Hale’s lack of knowledge and mental health weighed in her favor and strictly applied, no factor weighed against relief. However, the court noted that the factors are nonexclusive, the degree of importance of each factor varies depending on the facts and circumstances, and that the court was not bound by the IRS’s published guidelines.

 

Tax Controversy CPA/U.S. Tax Court Litigator

IRS Collection and Tax Litigation-Tax Controversy CPA/U.S. Tax Court Litigator: Raleigh and Wilmington, NC/North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach, SC